Is anyone really on time?

I am fortunate enough to have a job where my boss doesn’t watch what time I roll into the office every day. She is very much of the mindset that you get your job done and that’s what is most important. I think she also knows that when I come in late I typically stay late, or make up for it over the weekends, but the point is I don’t clock in and out.

I am not a morning person. Yes, I will get up at 4:20 am and go to boot camp, no I am not nice to people at 4:20 in the morning.

I’m not pleasant in the mornings. I’m focused (usually on my coffee) and I need to be left alone. If I see something that needs to get done, I’ll have to do it before I leave the house or I’ll be thinking about it all day while I’m at work. What can I say, I guess something is wrong with me like that.

When I’m driving to work and I’m going to be more than 30 minutes “late” I always think about my first day on my first job where I wasn’t there at 12:01 (my shift started at 12) and the person training me called my house to see if I was coming in. I walked in the door a minute later and she never said anything to me about calling my house.

When I got home my dad asked me why I was late to work. I was convinced I wasn’t late to work and he took the opportunity to make sure my 16-year-old brain understood that 1 minute late, is late.

Here’s what I’ve learned: he wasn’t wrong. Late is late, and even though I have flexibility in my job now I’m still embarrassed when I’m more than a few minutes late. I also know that one day I may have to have a job where I have a boss that cares what time I get there, or I may even have to actually clock in and clock out.

I get it. I manage teams of employees who have to get to work at a certain time, some of them have to actually clock in. My husband has a strict schedule at his job and he needs to be there at a certain time (or so he says). What we do and who we support typically dictates how important a set schedule is.

why you so obsessed

Even in flexible environments strolling in whenever ‘you get there’ can become a problem. Be sure and know your audience. It doesn’t hurt to be aware of big projects going on that require more of you and your co-workers time and trying to get in earlier during those tasks. And, for what it’s worth, if you’re the newest member to the team, or you are working on getting a promotion, or you have a new boss – get to work on time.

Also, take the time to let people know where you are or what your usual hours are. Whether it’s a group calendar, verbal conversation, or a sticky note on your door. The easier you are to find, the less frustrated people will be with you.

 

Your 1st job should suck

My 1st job  (that you read about here) didn’t suck that bad, but it kind of sucked. I had to work with my arch nemesis for starters… on a team…ick. Your first job should teach you teamwork. Teamwork with people you don’t want to be on a team with. Your 1st job should suck because you should work for people who piss you off, but it’s your 1st job so you can’t afford to quit. Your 1st job should teach you patience. Your 1st job should suck because you should have to work harder than you thought you would ever have to. Your 1st job should teach you appreciation. Your 1st job should suck because your parents will get a call at 12:01 when you’re not there yet, ya know because you were scheduled to be there at 12:00. Your 1st job should teach you to be punctual. Your 1st job should suck because you don’t understand the decisions the boss man makes, but you’re not in a place to speak up. Your 1st job should teach you trust.

I believe your first job should suck. You have to work some sucky jobs to appreciate a good job. And you can learn a lot from crappy jobs to apply to good jobs! I know this for a fact! If you haven’t had a crappy job, you’re really missing out on some good lessons and probably not appreciating your good job as much as you could. So go out there and get you a crappy job and learn as much as you can … and then… move on.