I don’t have WiFi, so F-U

Tonight I’m struggling to get my daily writing done because I have limited resources. I’m kicking it back to a blog post that I still stand by: the screw you fund.

I’ve learned that sometimes we need to be removed from a situation to realize that it was shady. Having an F-U fund will help you walk away from shady situations at work that don’t match your personal values. It’s okay to make that stand, it’s easier to make that stand when you have an F-U fund. So, I hope you’ll check out the original post and consider the option.

Peace, love, and F-U.

peace

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Simple meeting etiquette

Whether you like it or not, meetings are a part of your work life. Even when you think that the meeting could’ve been an email, I’ve learned you should be on your best behavior.

of-course-there

  • Don’t talk over people
  • Don’t interrupt people
  • Don’t storm out
  • When people talk over you, don’t roll your eyes
  • Patiently wait your turn
  • Write down your point if you’re afraid you’ll forget it (and again, don’t talk over people)
  • Don’t use slurs
  • Don’t use general labels (like Millennials this, millennials that<– also, GEN Zers are at work now, can you talk about GEN Z if you have to talk about a generation)
  • Don’t stay on your phone the whole time. The occasional google or search for a relevant email is probably okay, but don’t be surprised when other people judge your phone usage.
  • Take notes
  • Be present
  • Be on time. End on time. Respect other people’s calendars.

Check the tabs

I cannot tell you how many of my embarrassing work moments could’ve been avoided by just checking the tabs.

Most recently, here I am in a meeting with my peers, boss, and president of our company and here I am presenting my charts only to find I’m missing a huge chunk of data that no one else was missing.

<insert face palm here>

What am I doing? How did I miss the info I needed? HOW? I didn’t check the tabs…

excel tabs

Fellow skimmers, this is your reminder to scroll all the way down, check the tabs, pay attention. It’ll save you some embarrassment later.

 

Clap for the heavyweight champ

The people around you can make or break you. For whatever reason some people will believe that your success takes away from their success. Some people believe there’s not enough for all of us. Some people would rather hold you back than work on their own selves. Some people are motivated by all the wrong reasons. These are just a few reasons why it’s so important for you to surround yourself with the right people.

Not just the right mentors, but the right friends.  To become a better person and better at what you do, you need friends that are comfortable telling you when you are wrong. You need people who are willing to give you a nudge in the right direction when you need it. You need friends who you can call when you’re about to have a nervous breakdown right before you go on stage at a training event. You need people who believe in your abilities. You need people who will cheer you on. You need people who want to celebrate your victories.

clap

If you keep people around you who don’t want to see you make it to the top (whatever you define as the top for yourself), you probably won’t make it. No need to make the climb harder for yourself by keeping frenemies around. In 2019, weed out those who are against you and tighten your bond with those who are with you.

Flipping off customers

I got behind the wheel with road rage from day 1. Like an embarrassing amount of road rage.

From the time I was 16 until I was in my 20s I did not dial it down one single bit. No matter how much my parents or any other responsible adult in my life told me my road rage was out of control. (I know, I was just soooo coool).

Two things finally made me lay off the horn and stop screaming at people. 1) That crazy “Normal” episode of Criminal Minds. 2) Pulling into a potential customer site behind someone I had just yelled at for cutting me off.

The first reason is reason enough, if you haven’t seen the episode no need to go and watch it. If you know, you know.

The second reason was an eye opener because I could quickly quantify what that road rage just cost me if that was the person I was in a rush to meet with.

get off the road

Seriously, what if that person who cut me off was the decision maker for the meeting I was headed into. I wouldn’t have known the difference.

That experience made me realize that once you’re in certain roles, you are always wearing that hat any time you’re out in the community. Don’t get me wrong, that doesn’t mean you can’t be yourself. It probably just means that you should be respectful from the jump and make sure you don’t misrepresent yourself to a stranger… that could become a customer.

Or an employee.

Or a boss.

Or a co-worker.

Road rage isn’t healthy anyway so it was a good habit to break.

Is anyone really on time?

I am fortunate enough to have a job where my boss doesn’t watch what time I roll into the office every day. She is very much of the mindset that you get your job done and that’s what is most important. I think she also knows that when I come in late I typically stay late, or make up for it over the weekends, but the point is I don’t clock in and out.

I am not a morning person. Yes, I will get up at 4:20 am and go to boot camp, no I am not nice to people at 4:20 in the morning.

I’m not pleasant in the mornings. I’m focused (usually on my coffee) and I need to be left alone. If I see something that needs to get done, I’ll have to do it before I leave the house or I’ll be thinking about it all day while I’m at work. What can I say, I guess something is wrong with me like that.

When I’m driving to work and I’m going to be more than 30 minutes “late” I always think about my first day on my first job where I wasn’t there at 12:01 (my shift started at 12) and the person training me called my house to see if I was coming in. I walked in the door a minute later and she never said anything to me about calling my house.

When I got home my dad asked me why I was late to work. I was convinced I wasn’t late to work and he took the opportunity to make sure my 16-year-old brain understood that 1 minute late, is late.

Here’s what I’ve learned: he wasn’t wrong. Late is late, and even though I have flexibility in my job now I’m still embarrassed when I’m more than a few minutes late. I also know that one day I may have to have a job where I have a boss that cares what time I get there, or I may even have to actually clock in and clock out.

I get it. I manage teams of employees who have to get to work at a certain time, some of them have to actually clock in. My husband has a strict schedule at his job and he needs to be there at a certain time (or so he says). What we do and who we support typically dictates how important a set schedule is.

why you so obsessed

Even in flexible environments strolling in whenever ‘you get there’ can become a problem. Be sure and know your audience. It doesn’t hurt to be aware of big projects going on that require more of you and your co-workers time and trying to get in earlier during those tasks. And, for what it’s worth, if you’re the newest member to the team, or you are working on getting a promotion, or you have a new boss – get to work on time.

Also, take the time to let people know where you are or what your usual hours are. Whether it’s a group calendar, verbal conversation, or a sticky note on your door. The easier you are to find, the less frustrated people will be with you.

 

HR doesn’t make the rules

This one deserves more attention than I’m giving the short 33 career lessons, but this one is important so don’t let the brief summary fool you.

HR friends, you don’t make the rules. You may get to make some decisions, but you don’t make the rules.

If HR is sitting in their office making rules from afar that impact managers and employees we are doing business wrong. Our primary business service to the organization is to help facilitate solutions. Yes, we have to take into consideration all the data that helps us do a reasonable risk analysis, present solutions, and partner with folks for the right answer-but we don’t make the rules.

rules

We may offer guidance on what the safest solution is, but we don’t make the rules. We may even recite case-law and updated state and federal  laws, but we do not make the rules…

If you get defensive when a manager has an idea or suggestion and have to flex on them so they know you are in control, you are in the wrong field my friend. You’ll be miserable at work and you’ll hold your organization back.

If you hold up a process so you can remind people HR is an important function for getting work done, they are going to think less and less of HR and start working around you.

Don’t flex on folks and embarrass HR in 2019. Be useful, collaborate, build solutions and take your organization to the next level. Otherwise, you may be building the case for your company to not value HR at all.