Why’d you wear that?

I recently had a chance to catch up with some of my favorite local HR friends and let me just go on record now, that doesn’t happen enough! After catching up on other areas of life we did the usual: swapped weird stories, dissected everything around the one employee we can’t seem to make happy, and talked about our hiring woes.

A couple of the people in this group work at the same place and these two shared a fun story about their most recent hiring process which included interview faux pas. This one was a dress faux pas and as I sat with a look of sheer horror painted on my face while listening to them describe this terrible outfit choice for an interview, I remembered I have my own, “interview dress code violation.”

Listen, I tell the story of how I got into HR and Talent Management to every new crowd or client I get, but I usually leave out some of the details. Totally not on purpose because it just occurred to me last week that I’ve been skipping this part of the story. So here goes…

The day I interviewed with a staffing company (having no idea what I was getting into or what kind of job they would send me to) I was desperate. I was young and had been in Alabama for two whole months at that point and hadn’t landed a single job despite my best efforts. I always joke that employers could probably “smell the Arkansas” on me so they didn’t want to hire me. This was back in 2006, which happens to be the last time our college football team beat both Alabama and Auburn, today employers would probably just take pity on my Arkansas self and throw me some type of bone.

I digress.

So, I’m desperate. I need a job or I’m going to lose my mind. My then only boyfriend (now husband) had three jobs so like, we were fine $$ wise, but my sanity was absolutely in question. His sanity was probably in question too now that I think about it, I mean he did take me up there – KICKING AND SCREAMING – to apply. I was so stubborn I didn’t think I needed a staffing company to find me a job, I could find my own job, blah blah blah. I walk in and the lady at the front desk asks how she can help me. I tell her I’m here to apply and she hands me this thick packet of paper. Its 2006 and they just handed me a 20-page application, we are not off to a good start. She says “Do you want to fill it out here or take it home with you?” Friends, I knew if I took this application home, I wasn’t bringing it back so I quietly said “I’llfillitouthere.” She points me to a room to sit in while I complete this monstrous packet and the whole time I’m thinking “what am I doing here? What is happening? What if they want me to do assembly work? I would be terrible at assembly work. I’ll get fired; I won’t last one full shift of assembly work.”

I return to the front desk with a completed application. She says “Ok, follow me.” She plops my application down in front of the office manager who is eating a bag of popcorn and tells me to have a seat. YALL! I WAS IN AN INTERVIEW AND I DIDNT EVEN KNOW IT.

 

interview ready

This interview was so calm, so methodical, and every other question was followed with a couple of bites of popcorn. I’m still thinking “what is happening?” over and over again. By the end of the interview the office manager asks if I want to work in the office. I said I’d take it, a little too excitedly and that totally caught her off guard, but I felt relief from here to heaven that she didn’t offer me an assembly job and I just couldn’t contain myself. We discuss the details and work out my start date (the very next morning because I was tired of sitting in our empty apartment) and she says “one more thing… you’ll need to wear something less revealing in the office.”

So, here’s the part of the story I could’ve told you earlier… that same day I had drove myself to Huntsville and interviewed at Hooters. When you interview for Hooters, you dress the part (I think). I had a tight, black, low-cut top on that proved I was qualified for the job. When I interviewed for my first job in the recruiting realm, I was dressed like I was interviewing for a job at Hooters because I had.

I grabbed at my shirt when she said this, smiled awkwardly and said “of course, absolutely” and carried my red faced self out the door (only to discover that my sweet boyfriend had left me there and I needed to go back inside and use the phone to call him and  find out why he had left me there to relish in my tight, low-cut shame).

If that office manager had made a decision based on how I was dressed, she would’ve missed an opportunity to hire someone who became one of the best recruiters and closer at the company. She also would’ve missed an opportunity to hire someone who was sometimes the biggest pain in the neck she had, but I like to think my excellent numbers and customer service skills outweighed most of that. Some issues you can easily manage, like not the best choice in tops for an interview, but some issues also don’t have anything to do with how well a person will work, like not the best choice in tops for an interview.

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If she would’ve said I couldn’t do that job because I dressed the wrong way for the interview, there is no telling what my career would’ve ended up being. I know it wouldn’t have been Hooters though, because they never called me again.

Take it easy on job seekers

Changing jobs is a highly stressful experience for us humans. Even positive changes can bring about uncertainty, but yet too many people on the hiring side of the desk treat this like a chance to tell people they aren’t good enough or don’t follow directions. I personally think we need to offer a lot more grace in this process and take a few minutes to listen to a candidate. Learn about their skills and why they are interested in joining your company.

Here’s the reality, job seekers get bad job advice from all kinds of people. Employed people think the fact that they have a job makes them qualified to give job seekers advice and that’s not necessarily a fact. People find jobs a variety of ways, and decision makers have a variety of preferences. What works for one job seeker, may not work for another, but job seekers don’t know the difference until it’s too late. They do the best they can with the information they have, yet here we are, complaining about them like they should be experts at landing their next position-especially one with the company we work for!

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In 2019 I want you all to stop disqualifying candidates for things that are not skills related. If the job you are recruiting for doesn’t require uber attention to detail, then stop disqualifying applicants for misspelled words and grammar mistakes. Don’t assume that someone who left their last three jobs before they were there for a year can’t do your job. Make sure you know why a bachelors is “required” so you know what you’re really looking for.

Talk to people.

Look, in all my years of recruiting I’ve learned that your next best hire might make their way to you in one of the most unconventional ways so dial it down a notch. Get off your high horse before karma knocks you off it. When it does knock you off of it, I hope you know everything you need to know to be the perfect job seeker.

You might be surprised

At a previous job, a high school internship program was something no one wanted to oversee. One of the issues we had with it was that it came from the top down and we were like “um, we have enough stuff to do, but thanks anyway.”

Another reason we were not interested is because we didn’t have time to waste with high school students when we needed to spend time targeting college students.

The ridiculous part there is, we were being stubborn and failing to consider how engaging with interested high school students might later make engaging with college students easier, but I’ll come back to that.

I remember when the initiative hit my desk and I was like NO WAY! My boss pulled rank though and said his NO WAY over ruled my NO WAY so I was stuck with it.

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That meant I had to dig around for any and all documentation we may require for employing high school students; labor laws that mandated what they could and could not do and when they could and could not work; and how to navigate events with minors. Specifically, our annual lake house event. Do the kids get to sign the waiver? Do their parents have to sign it? Does it matter? Etc. All tasks I was not excited about even though I knew that it would be easy enough to find the answers.

Thankfully the first group of high school interns for the program was a small group. The technical mentor was a very knowledgeable employee who really took the time to invest in their learning that summer so that helped a lot too.

My biggest hurdles including incorporating them appropriately into an already established college intern program while making sure they were welcomed, learned valuable things, and had a good experience.

By the end of the summer the high school interns became my favorite interns. They were more dependable, inquisitive, invested, and polite than some of the college interns. (Sorry to my former college interns that are reading this, don’t worry though yall will always be my sweet baby interns LOL #IheartMATLAB…). Anyway, all the interns were great, but the high school interns really showed out.

After that first summer I couldn’t wait for the next round of high school interns. It was also cool that other companies started calling us and asking us how we did it. Since my boss adamantly refused to run the program, I was the go-to for these kinds of questions and I have to admit-that was fun!

Now I get the opportunity to go sit with other companies and help them develop an effective high school internship program. I also help local schools when I can on getting their messaging out to other companies who could benefit from a defined strategic high school internship program. (side note, I do that as much as possible because I remember how much I didn’t want to implement the program so I know I can’t be the only one having that reaction, so I want to help people see the possible end result when I can).

Something I thought would be glorified babysitting turned out to be one of my favorite things to participate in. I also very much enjoy running into former high school interns who can articulate how that experience from our program has helped them on their career path. Once those former high school interns got to college, they willingly became a resource to help with on site recruiting efforts. They basically became built-in brand ambassadors. To be fair, our college interns did too, but there was something to be said about having a brand ambassador on board from the first time they stepped foot on campus.

Moral of the story? Step out of your comfort zone at some point in 2019 and volunteer for something you wouldn’t normally do. If you hate it you never have to do it again, but you might be surprised.

What can I do for #GivingTuesday?

Giving Tuesday is here friends! Giving Tuesday happens the Tuesday after U.S. Thanksgiving (and ya know, Black Friday & Cyber Monday), it’s an international day of charitable giving.

Who am I giving to on this #GivingTuesday? I’m so glad you asked! The answer is CodeCrew! CodeCrew mentors underrepresented youth to be tech innovators and leaders through practical, hands-on computer science education programs throughout Memphis. Learn everything there is to know about CodeCrew here and follow them on Facebook.

Giving Tuesday CodeCrew

As a Technical Recruiter an organization like CodeCrew is clearly of interest to me & this place is even more special to me because it’s in Memphis. Not that I’m from Memphis, but I’m from close to Memphis and spent a lot of time there when I was growing up. I also had the opportunity to spend a day with some of the CodeCrew team earlier this year and I cannot say enough good things about them.

I constantly find myself in the middle of conversations with other recruiters and hiring managers about supposed “skill gaps” and I always ask the same thing to people discussing this challenge: “What are you doing to train future talent?” Basically, lets find a way to solve the problem. If you think the talent pool is lacking something, invest in it. Find ways to get the talent pool interested in what your organization does early on and support it.

If you or your organization is struggling with a “skills gap” then I want to challenge you to give to CodeCrew (or find a similar type organization to support) TODAY. You don’t have to be in Memphis to benefit from supporting CodeCrew, future tech leaders are going to come from everywhere so please don’t let that stop you. CodeCrew’s programs are having a huge impact on our future talent and you have an opportunity to be a part of that by supporting them through a donation that can make Computer Science education available to more students and schools.

You can donate directly to CodeCrew here! Now go to tell your friends about #GivingTuesday and CodeCrew.

Leading the witness

Often times we are eager to interview candidates to join our organization and some times we get so excited or have so much information to cover that we make this common interview mistake – we lead the witness.

leading the witness

With an estimated 5-6 million jobs open in the U.S. right now it makes sense that we would get eager to fill our jobs and excited to sell the candidate on our work, before letting the candidate do some talking. I’ve seen interviewers make this mistake so many times, and I always cringe when they do because it will directly impact the outcome of the interview/hiring decision.

I recently conducted a recruiting training with an HR team and I spent a lot of time on leading the witness, so much so that I had the team role play some cold calls and interviews to show them when they do this. Leading the witness can start as early as the first call (which I think is a result of so many people beating into the heads of recruiters that candidates don’t really want to talk to us – so in turn they blab everything about the job in 35 seconds because they are afraid they will never get that person on the phone again). Their HR director spoke up at one point in the training and said “If you ever get to sit in on an interview with Kristina, watch her…she does very little talking.” This is mostly because I want to hear what the candidate has to say (listen to learn), but it’s partially so I don’t do any leading. Of course to do this, you must be able to power through awkward silence. A lot of interviewers will jump to fill the silence when things get awkward and then babble down a path of telling the candidate exactly what the organization is looking for.

Now don’t get me wrong, the candidate should know what your organization is looking for and your culture shouldn’t be a secret. When you’ve done all the talking upfront and over shared what your company is looking for, you’re setting the candidate up to form their answers around what you want to hear. This makes it harder to screen for a culture fit since you’ve given away all of your culture buzzwords before you’ve heard what the candidate has in mind for their next position.

Here’s an example:

Interviewer: Here at XYZ company we are looking for candidates who believe in bringing their A game every day, we have no “off days” here. Employees give 110%. We believe in working late hours when we have a project deadline approaching, and expect project deadlines to be more important than anything else. We want some one who likes to play hard when it’s time to celebrate… etc. What are you looking for in your next job?

Interviewee: (thinking to themselves: an 8-5 where I can get my job done and go home and spend time with my kids every night, but gee, right now I really need a job) Well, I’m looking for a group of people who believe in hard work and put project deadlines above everything else.

Kind of a crummy example, but as I thought up example after example they all were descriptive of either my current or former employers and I don’t want to show all of their cards or call anyone out. The mistake here is telling them so much about your environment and THEN asking them what they want. In some cases the candidate is going to be perfectly honest with you and then you can have an honest discussion whether this is the right fit for them and the organization. In other cases people are going to say whatever you want to hear to get hired-at least until they can find the right job for themselves. In some cases people aren’t setting out to lie to you, they just haven’t put any thought into that question so they parrot back everything they just heard you say.

This mistake is most important to avoid in a company where you are screening for culture fit. If you believe culture is driving the success of your business, why widen the risk of bringing in someone who is just trying to fake it? Before you say it, remember we’ve talked about “there’s a place for everyone” i.e. “there’s a culture for everyone.”Also, this isn’t permission to disqualify people for the wrong reason. You CAN define culture so don’t rely on a vague “not a culture fit” reason for not extending an offer.

A quick search for some stats estimate that 80% of employee turnover is due to bad hiring decisions and one of the reasons this happens is the candidate isn’t really a culture fit and it wasn’t discovered in the interview process (even though it can be). There’s all kinds of stats that pop up when looking to identify how much a bad hire costs our organizations – one source said 1/3 of the employee pay, one source says 50-60% of the pay, and another says 2.5 times their salary. There are a lot of variables to consider when calculating this number, but know this: you can actually identify how much it costs your organization. So, calculate it for your organization and use that number. Data outside of your organization should mostly be taken with a grain of salt in my opinion. Especially considering there is no one size fits all solution to any of our issues, right?

Super easy solutions to this “leading the witness” mistake in general. Ask your questions first. Then expand on the job and organization after your questions have been answered and give the interviewee a chance to ask you questions. Too much to remember? Try this, if Jack McCoy would get scolded for it in the courtroom, steer clear in the interview. Awkward silence is okay, let the interviewee think and you listen.

Three Interview Rule

I’ve always suffered a bit of a professional identity crisis. Am I recruiting or am I HR? Am I both? Are they one in the same? I’ve gone back and forth, but one thing I can say without a doubt that fits with both HR and Recruiting is solid relationships with your hiring managers. I’ve had a lot of opportunities to learn how to manage this relationship and the most challenging was when recruiting for a highly technical engineering company. One thing that drove me crazy was the constant need for “more candidates” for one position. If you’re experiencing the same challenge, let me share my three interview rule with you (it’s really simple).

Me to hiring manager: Here are three candidates that fit what you are looking for based on the extensive discussions we’ve had around your current hiring need.

Hiring manager to me: Great, let’s interview all three of them.

*Interviews all of them*

Hiring manager to me: I want to interview more candidates.

Me to hiring manager: What did you not like about these three?

Hiring manager to me: I don’t know.

Me to hiring manager: Then we are starting over.

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Why would I tell them we are starting over? Because if you have found three candidates that fit the criteria you’ve discussed with the hiring manager and they still can’t make a decision, then they do not know what they are looking for. When I talk to a hiring manager we discuss every aspect of the position I can with them- minimum skills required, type of work, who the customer is, who they will report to, personalities of the team members they need to work with, day to day environment, education requirements, length of contract, hours of the schedule, peak seasons, when they might be required to work extra, what materials will they be working with…you get the picture. ANYTHING that is relevant that can help me find the perfect candidate for my customer, the hiring manager.

The three interview rule won’t work when you’ve given them candidates who do not match the job req so you should only pull this out when you’re candidates are a match for what you and the hiring manager discussed. This rule can be applied to any position, not just technical ones. Having the discussion about no more than three interviews the right way will help you build credibility with your hiring managers. Approach it as a way to revisit the job you are working on and what might need to be revisited as a requirement, not as a power move. Use it as a way to show you support the hiring manager and respect their time so you want to make sure you have the right information to get it right and help them make an informed decision. Continuing to give them candidates when they cannot tell you what they didn’t like about the qualified candidates already submitted will only drag out the hiring process.

Give it a shot and let me know how it works! As always, if you have questions, I’d be happy to answer them!

 

Do you mind if I pray?

No, I don’t mind if you pray.

What I do mind is that you asked me that question while I was in the middle of an interview process with your company. I do mind that you were the HR manager of a large organization and still risked asking that question during an interview. I said I didn’t mind, but I wonder if I would’ve got the job if I said I did mind.

What I do mind is that I never called you out on putting me on the spot like that or making hiring decisions based on who people pray to.

HRs role in the skills gap

Day 2 of #SHRM16 is underway and I’m hearing a lot of good things and seeing some fun takeaways via social media for all levels of HR professionals.

Mike Rowe and Alan Mulally killed it yesterday at the opening session-I never thought a story about poo could be so entertaining and educational (in more than one way). I love Mike Rowe’s work to close the skills gap, it is absolutely intriguing to me as a recruiter. I’m never surprised at how often companies use the “skills gap” as a problem to blame the results of their subpar recruiting functions on. We throw around this term to protect our team and pretend like someone else created this problem for us, but guess who contributed to the skills gap? US! As recruiters and hr professionals we should be helping high schools and colleges understand what our employers need, before our employers need it!

Here’s the deal, its 2016. We have access to people like  never before and it’s time to use it. If we can’t find the talent we need, its our own fault. We must take an active role in preparing the next generation of our employers workforce. How do we do that? We get to know what our future needs are and we get in the schools and start talking about it. Its not always glamorous, but someone has to do the job. If you think people view skills relevant and required for your industry as something they don’t want to do then fix it.Don’t just complain about it being a challenge! Revive it. Don’t misrepresent it, share the good, bad, and the ugly and let students know what all of their options are. If high school students are only hearing from engineering companies while they are deciding on what to do after high school, then you’re going to have a lot of students go off to get an engineering degree and then we will eventually have way more engineers than we can hire and not enough candidates for a variety of other positions.

So where I hail from a lot of people become teachers, nurses, or take up a career at the steel mill in town. I wondered why a majority of people chose 1 of those 3 options more than anything else, but looking back those are the professions we were exposed to the most through career days and that’s what the majority of our parents did. The exposure to the professions had a direct impact on the path we chose. It wasn’t necessarily the glamorous exposure of the professions that intrigued us either, it was the correlation to impacting something bigger that drew us in. No one wakes up and says I want to teach teenagers today, they usually have a revelation that they want to impact the lives of teenagers or instill an excitement about a particular subject in them. Without identifying the motivation behind the work, they are just teaching teenagers.

As Mike shared his story of his experience in the sewer with a full time sewer professional I kept thinking “how would I sell this job to a candidate?” Boy, have I got a job for you? You work underground and get a close up view of the inner workings of our wonderful city. You’ll have companions that won’t talk your ear off to keep you company through your shift and probably focused through your tasks.As most jobs do, this one comes with its own set of hazards, but nothing a rubber suit can’t protect you from. The residents of our city will undoubtedly appreciate your work  and even view you as a hero because they understand the necessity of your work to keep s*#! flowing.

No. That’s not what I would do at all, but that’s what some of us are doing, which is causing us more problems beyond the skills gap. We are trying to sell made up glamour instead of acknowledging the realities of the positions we are trying to fill and hoping the right candidate will pick us. This approach is contributing to the skills gap and we aren’t even acknowledging it because we are just trying to make our field/company sound like a fun place to work that will pamper you so we are pretending like we are doing the right thing. Now we have people who have chosen a field based on the half truth we sold them in a specific field and now they are in a career they are unhappy with because another field they weren’t exposed to was probably a better fit for them. Instead, we should uncover the skills gap, shine a light on the cause of it, and get out there and educate people before they choose their professions.

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Don’t forget about me

It’s Labor Day and instead of laboring, I’m catching up on some HR blog reading. I love that blogging and other social media channels allow me to keep up with so many awesome HR professionals leading the way in our field, but with the good comes the bad. There are absolutely zero quals to start a blog and anyone can do it (hello, including myself) and so some advice that I think is bad seeps out onto the interwebs. As I read posts that send shivers down my HR spine I recall my friend Ben once telling me that there is a culture fit for everyone somewhere, but I can’t imagine who is a fit for wherever these rules oriented, sour HR professionals conduct business. All of that to really say that you’ll read a million posts on candidate experience with a million different takes on it/the importance of it/how to execute it/etc., but I think a lot of them are missing a huge point that we aren’t talking about.

dont you forget about meThe candidate. Not what the candidate is going to tell their friends or say online, but the actual candidate. It’s more than the process the candidate has to go through to be considered for a position with your company, the right ATS won’t fix your candidate experience. It’s more than showing the bells and whistles your organization has to offer, the right perks won’t fix your candidate experience. It’s the person on the other end of the process that has to consider all the avenues of change they are about to embark on. It’s about the candidate considering leaving the known for the unknown. It’s about the candidate having a voice and it being okay for the candidate to use that voice to say “this isn’t the job for me,” and not getting snarky remarks back from a recruiter.

Change is difficult, even when change is necessary. A job change is stressful! I’ve only been a recruiter for about ten years, but I’ve recruited for a variety of fields and the one thing that is unchanged is that the candidate always has a decision to make and they always have more than one choice. At minimum they can choose to come work for your organization or they can choose not to. The candidate experience should be more important than a possible online review because just like you, your candidates are human and are having to make a huge decision. To the candidate this whole experience is leading up to a life change, usually in more ways than one. To you and your organization it’s a business transaction, regardless of how much you care about your employees, to fill a need within the organization so your company can continue to make money.

Dehumanizing the candidate is a huge contributor to the bad reputation that some recruiters have. When you’re just filling a position instead of working to pair the right candidate to the right opportunity you lose an important piece of recruiting-connecting with people. Connecting with people is more than reading a resume or doing a quick phone screen. Connecting with people takes an effort.

failure to communicateI had a client that would always say “I need warm bodies, if they can fog a mirror-send them!” I couldn’t operate like that, that’s not okay. An animal can fog a mirror. That’s not a nice way to “order more humans” for your organization. This is an example of a mindset issue. We had a lot of problems at this customer site. High-turnover and lots of employee relations issues. Is it any wonder why? Phrases like that and “oh they are a dime a dozen,” etc. take away from the value that people can bring to your organization. Even people who are taking jobs starting out at $8.00 an hour have a choice to make and every option comes with pros and cons. They are also human and can bring value to the right opportunity.

We must also remember that our candidates that we are chasing down at $200,000 a year are human and have a huge decision to make. They shouldn’t just accept your offer because “that’s a lot of money.” Accepting a new position rarely affects just one person. The candidate may have a spouse, children, pets, parents to take care of, or any number of other obligations that this position could interfere with. No matter the stock options and bonuses you throw at these high level positions these people are human too and in some sense of their new job have to start over at some things.

I want you to think about this through a true recruiting perspective. How will your candidate accepting this position impact your organization and how will your candidate accepting this position impact your candidate. It’s more than just a resume match. HR professionals love to highlight that we have a unique position within the organization because we have to operate with the perspective of what’s best for the employer and the employees. This responsibility is why I believe recruiting falls under the HR umbrella, if it does at all.

Get an intern!

Every HR department needs an intern! I’m convinced. After having my first experience with an HR intern for our department, I’m sold. We legit needed help with our workload, but from the beginning my little HR heart hoped we would be able to give back to the advancement of the profession while getting some real work done. The thing is, our company has a ballin’ intern program that allows engineering students (with 3.5 GPA and up) an opportunity to work on some meaningful technical tasks for our customers. The work they get to do gives them a glimpse of what their field looks like and if they really want to do what they thought they wanted to do. Being an engineering firm we really stumped ourselves when adding an essential business systems intern to the mix. Do we even include this intern in our intern program? For example, at the end of every summer our interns do a technical presentation, open to the entire company to attend, on what their project was. Engineers talking engineering appeals to other engineers, but would HR appeal to our engineers? Would anyone care? What can we teach this HR intern about real HR without spending too much time training? How can we help this intern be sure that HR is the right path.

Amazingly enough I feel like we tackled all of our tough questions this summer and though we were not able to give our intern a lot of HR related work, we made sure we explained things to her that we talked about so she could have an idea of what was going on. I say that, but maybe it isn’t that it’s not HR related work as much as us experienced pros forget that it’s HR related, you know in the grand scheme of things. Anyway, we included her in staff meetings, took her to our local SHRM chapter meetings (NASHRM), encouraged her to do a project to present on and 100% included her in the intern program. She told me she learned a lot this summer and even through filing and scheduling interviews she was exposed to some HR tasks that she hadn’t known existed. When we had a session on benefits at a NASHRM luncheon I encouraged her afterwards to sit down with one of our benefits specialist to understand what all of the benefits talk meant. During interview set up she was faced with a lot of questions about the position that sometimes made her feel like a recruiter rather than a scheduler. She did a lot of research on her recruiting related project and we tested out some of her social media ideas at a NASHRM event. I think we did a great job exposing her to the world of HR and giving her a lot of scenarios that she can use in the classroom this fall when she returns to the classroom for her junior year.

Not only did she do a GREAT job, she gave us all GREAT gifts at the end of the summer! Woo-hoo!

Not only did she do a GREAT job, she gave us all GREAT gifts at the end of the summer! Woo-hoo!

I know it is not always possible to bring in an intern, but I think it’s the best way for us to grow our profession. The future or HR needs guidance and mentoring, so let’s do something about it! Even if you cannot bring in an intern, maybe you can set up a few job shadowing days, those are unpaid ya dig? Making yourself available to HR students to answer their questions or be an example is a great way to make sure that the progress of HR thus far, doesn’t get undone. What are your thoughts? Have you had an HR intern in the past? What was your experience? Any tips on setting up job shadow days for HR students? Leave them in the comments below.